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20110301
20110331
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. his father, albert, joins us now from york, pennsylvania. mr. snyder, what was your reaction to today's supreme court decision? >> i was kind of shocked. i can't believe that the supreme court today has now told us that we have no rights to bury our dead in peace. it's a sad at a for our military men and women, their families. it's a sad day for all america americans. my first thought is what kind of society have we become? >> couric: are you surprised the decision was so overwhelming with eight out of nine justices backing the protesters? >> yes, i was, katie. they may be book smart but they don't have the common sense god gave a goat. you know, the justices and the government will send their children to war, and they'll send them back in body bags, and then they can't even give us enough respect to pure them in peace. >> couric: the church has protested outside many other funerals. what would you say to other grieving families today? >> well, there's not much we can do about it anymore. when the government won't do anything about it and the courts give us no remedy, then people are
will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
's more dangerous than a healthy one, which once again raises the question-- just what should the u.s. do moving forward? david martin begins our coverage. >> reporter: there may be no american troops on the ground, but c.i.a. officers are operating inside libya. among other things, they picked up a member of the air crew of that american jet which crashed last week. their primary goal is to find out who the rebels are and what they need, but defense secretary gates today threw cold water on the idea that the u.s. is about to start arming or training the rebels. >> there are many countries that can do that. that's not a unique capability for the united states, and as far as i'm concerned, somebody else should do that. >> reporter: but gates clearly thinks somebody, perhaps an arab country, should. >> the opposition needs as much as anything right now is some training, some command and control, and some organization. it's a pretty-- it's pretty much a pickup ballgame at this point. >> reporter: testifying on the day nato took command of the operation, gates said the u.s. would start pullin
with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and today on capitol hill, u.s. energy secretary and nuclear expert steven chu said he, too, is baffled. >> and ther
. but defense secretary gates said they would be used in libya only for emergency evacuations or to deliver relief supplies. he raised a host of reservations about military intervention. no authorization from either the u.n. or nato, reluctance to tie up force which is might be needed in afghanistan, concerns about fanning anti-american sentiment in the rest of the arab world. >> we also have to think about, frankly, the use of the u.s. military in another country in the middle east. >> reporter: gates said he was unable to gauge the rebels' chances of overthrowing qaddafi. >> it remains to be seen how effectively military leaders who have defected from qaddafi's forces can organize the opposition in the country. >> reporter: secretary of state clinton ticked off future scenarios for libya, and two out of three were bad. >> libya could become a peaceful democracy or it could face protracted civil war or it could descend into chaos. >> reporter: the u.s. and britain are openly talking about setting up a no-fly zone over libya. >> it is not acceptable to have a situation where colonel qaddafi
and to provide more humanitarian aid to libyans. at the same time, u.s. and coalition partners kept up the military attacks, launching 22 cruise missile on targets in tripoli. qaddafi's forces, however, are still better armed than the opposition and today they have the rebels on the run. they were forced to retreat just as they prepared to attack qaddafi's hometown of surt. instead, though, they were pushed back more than 25 miles, and not just by the military baby civilians who remain loyal to qaddafi. mandy clark reports tonight from the ever-shifting front line. >> reporter: an attack by qaddafi forces took rebels by surprise at bin jawad. they fought hard with everything they had but were forced back. and even while fleeing came under fire. they had originally retreated to the town because of a new threat rebels here say it wasn't just government forces but also residents firing from their homes that forced them to pull back. they confiscated these weapons handed out by qaddafi forces from locals who were loyal to the regime. how many weapons did you find in total? >> reporter: ano
in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may have been too close for comfort for the libyan dictator. mark phillips is in tripoli. >> reporter: of all the targets that have been hit in these attacks, this flattened building in the qaddafi compound in tripoli is the one the qaddafi loyalists have complained about most. this is the attack they claim was launched to kill him. despite the hundreds of people who have gathered or been gathered around the complex to provide protection. >> families, children, men and women have come from everywhere to stay day and night to protect this location, to protect this location and the rocket hits only 52 to 100 meters away from them. >> reporter: qaddafi himself was probably not in his tent. he hasn't been seen since before the bombing began. his location a se
qaddafi and his supporters they will be held accountable for the violence and the u.s. and its allies are still considering military options. today, nato plans began round-the-clock surveillance of libya. opposition forces in the east want nato to ground qaddafi's air force after it bombed several key oil towns today. mandy clark reports tonight from abbey ya. >> reporter: this is why libya's rebels are begging for a no-fly zone. we were the first journalists on the scene after this bombing. people ignored the danger and raced to show us the damage. he's hitting his own people with bombs, young children, he's killing them, this man says. just minutes ago we were driving down the road to get to the front line when a government warplane dropped two bombs behind us. the shrapnel from those bombs is still warm. near the craters, the wreckage of a pickup truck. a family with three children was in it when qaddafi's air force struck. two of the children died. the survivors were slashed by the slash nell. the circling warplanes made for a jumpy day on the front lines. do you find that even th
and the front was moving quickly to the west. now the rebels seem to be in full-scale retreat and are telling us not to go any further because qaddafi forces are approaching once more. rebels are starting to show their combat fatigue, outgunned and regularly outflanged in the field, they lack any sort of military strategy or leadership. >> this is not my profession but what can we do now? we must do anything to push this hell and nobody helps us. >> reporter: they desperately need command and control if they hope to make any battlefield gains. they are eager to take ground but are quick to flee when they face any real fight. one simple problem here is communication. networks are down, satellite phones are rare, and there's not a two-way radio in sight. it's difficult to know how the ribbles are communicating. erica. >> hill: mandy clark, mandy, thanks. and with the rebels steadily losing ground, the debate over arming them grows louder, but as david martin reports, the obama administration has good reason to tread carefully on that iss issue. >> reporter: the rebels' sudden reverses have reveale
are soaring and the area is being evacuated. most flights between the u.s. and japan have been canceled, and there were fear it is tsunami would pound the u.s., but by the time the waves reached hawaii and the west coast this morning, they had lost most of their punch. president obama said he's heartbroken by the disaster. u.s. assistance is already on the way to japan. lucy craft is there. >> reporter: the monster quake, thought to be the largest in japan's history triggered a ferocious series of tsunamis. a 23-foot wall of water poured over the northern japanese coastline with little warning. only minutes after the quick hit sweeping away everything and everyone in its path. cars were tossed like toys. boats were battered by the tides. this tanker was swept up on to the shore. another ship fought to escape a massive whirlpool. and the state of the boat and its crew is unknown. >> a tsunami obviously coming in several sweeps. >> reporter: minutes later a a second deadly wave. surging water overtook coastal city streets, ripping fishing boats from their moorings and swamping buildings.
're destroying everything," he told us. most of the people who come to this hospital at least know where their loved ones are, but there are many more families who simply don't know the fate of the missing. he turned on libyan state television last night and saw his cousins tied up and displayed as rebel prisoners captured in bin jawaad. that one? he showed us the video and insisted neither man was a fighter. how does it make you feel when you look at this? "i feel angry. these are young people. how can they end up in a situation like this?" he told us. the world may be shocked at the spectacle of burning oil pipelines, but it's the cost in human lives that's on the minds of most libyans tonight. mandy clark, cbs news, agdibiya. >> couric: meanwhile, mark phillips has made it to answer, a, where iia, ah, where qaddafi loyalists have fought bloody battle with the opposition. mark other both side were claiming victory today, but what did you see when you were out and about? >> reporter: the government has been claiming victory for at least two days here but it has been impossible to get he
, including imposing a no-fly zone which would ground libya's air force. today the u.s. moved a destroyer and a marine amphibious task force closer to libya, and the treasury said at least $30 billion in libyan assets have been frozen. in spite of all that and with much of libya in opposition hands, qaddafi still refuses to leave, telling abc "all my people love me." we have a team of correspondents in the region. first, kelly cobiella in tripoli >> reporter: for the second time, a funeral in this eastern suburb of tripoli turned into a protest. people here claimed qaddafi's gunmen killed five of their neighbors during demonstrations last friday. what you don't see are qaddafi's security forces, as they arrived shooting their guns in the air foreign journalists were forced to leave. a cell phone camera caught this battle 125 miles from the capital in the city of misurata. qaddafi's men have been trying to taken a airfield and ammunitions depot for days and still haven't won. closer to the capital, just 30 miles to the west, anti-government protestors are holding the oil refinery town of z
indicators are that are telling us a real turn is afoot. >> reporter: the number of people filing first-time unemployment claims has been falling steadily and is now at its lowest level since july, 2008. among all industries, 68% are hiring. that's the broadest range in more than 22 years. >> we're hiring here. >> reporter: at pennsylvania-based almack clinical technologies, which helps pharmaceutical companies conduct drug trials, president jim murphy has more than 40 openings, but he's having trouble filling those highly skilled jobs. >> for a certain skill set, the unemployment rate is extremely low. >> reporter: in fact, for workers with a bachelor's degree or higher, the unemployment rate is just 4.3%. at bison gear and engineering in st. charles, illinois, ron bullock is also struggling to find qualified workers. >> we've gone up to a year and a half filling an engineering position. >> reporter: manufacturing, health care, even the construction industry added jobs in february. but nine states still have double-digit unemployment led by california and florida at 12% and above and n
traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on americans to leave tokyo because of radiation concerns. and u.s. officials say it's unlikely dangerous levels of radiation will reach hawaii or the u.s. mainland. we have extensive coverage of the disaster in japan beginning with harry smith on the nuclear crisis. >> reporter: after a day of sharp spikes, radiation levels at the earthquake stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear plant are said to be falling. this morning there are reports of a new fire at the plant. people throughout japan are on edge. >> ( translated ): they say we are safe but it makes me wonder. it is really safe? >> reporter: japan's prime minister, naoto kan, tried to reassure his country but he said more radiation leaks are likely and ordered those in the danger zone to seal themselves indoors. american sean scisle says his plan is to get out while he can. >> last night we packed bags in case of an emergency and, you know, just better safe than sorry. we're probably going to be getting out of fukushima prefecture either late tonight or early tomorr
another. >> reporter: but republicans say a spike in u.s. jihadist terror plots justify their focus. between may of 2009 and november, 2010, arrests were made for 22 such plots-- more than in the previous seven years combined. >> there is that small element in the community that's radicalizing. >> reporter: poisoning the atmosphere was king's own past assertion-- that most u.s. mosques are run by radicals. >> cleaning a dirty kitchen you can't clean it with dirty water. >> reporter: king is from long island and his relations with muslim leaders there deteriorated after 9/11. >> we have some serious concerns because congressman king has been a muslim barber. >> reporter: keith ellison, one of two muslim congressmen, broke down as he recalled a paramedic killed on 9/11 who was later smeared because of his muslim faith. >> his life should not be identify as just a member of the ethnic group or just a member of a religion. >> reporter: despite the tension, king called this his happiest day. >> i challenge anyone to find anything that was improper about today's hearing. >> reporter: in f
the tactic letting guns walk. in this case into the hands of criminals who would use them in mexico and the u.s. doddson's bosses say that never happened. now he's risking his job to go public. >> i'm boots on the ground here in phoenix and telling you we've been doing it everyday since i've been here. here i am. tell me i didn't do the things that i did. tell me you didn't order me to do the things i did. tell me it didn't happen. now you have a name on it, you have a face to put with it. here i am. someone. now tell me it didn't happen. >> reporter: agent doddson and other insiders say the gun-walking strategy was approved all the way to the justice department. the idea was to see where the guns ended up, build a big case and take down a major cartel and it was all kept secret from mexico. a.t.f. named the case "fast and furious." this surveillance video obtained by cbs news shows suspected drug cartel suppliers carrying boxes of weapons to their cars at a phoenix gun shop. those long boxes being loaded into the red car are a.k.-47 type assault rifles. >> reporter: so it turns out a.t.f. not
on qaddafi's hometown of surt. just the same, a top u.s. military official says the rebels are not a robust fighting force and their gains may not be permanent. mandy clark is with the rebels in ras lanuf. >> this could be the midwest decisive battle yet in libya's civil war. in the span of just 48 hours, the ragtag army of students, laborers and some soldiers once loyal to the regime are now threatening qaddafi's hometown. the push west would have been impossible without coalition air strikes that pounded qaddafi's tanks and troops and trapped rebels in ajdabiya. allied air raids forced the regime's army into full retreat, allowing the rebels to retake control of the key oil hubs of brega and ras lanuf. despite those gains, these men are moving cautiously. they want to avoid traps set by qaddafi's forces. the first push to tripoli ended here in bin jiwad. rebels, believing residents were on their side, were led into a deadly ambush. now they say they've learned from that costly mistake. rebels say they're now doing clearing operations. >> ( translated ): we have learned to secure and hold
today. coffins and body bags are in short supply and crematoriums are overwhelmed. u.s. and other foreign aid is pouring in for the millions of survivors in need of food, water and housing. emergency shelters are overflowing. japan's central bank pumped billions of dollars into the country's economy to shore it up. the prime minister is taking charge of managing the nuclear crisis and he's asking the u.s. for technical expertise to cool the damaged reactors and prevent a meltdown. u.s. officials say experts see no scenario in which harmful levels of radiation will reach the united states. we have a team of correspondents deployed throughout japan tonight. first, celia hatton in fukushima >> reporter: japan's nuclear nightmare continues, a second hydrogen explosion at the fukushima dai-ichi nuclear complex in just three days injured 11 workers. like saturday's initial explosion, today's blast destroyed the reactor's exterior though officials say its core is intact. this was followed by news another reactor in the complex is also overheating so the prospect of a third explosion is l
. today that only seemed to enrage the rebels more. "qaddafi you coward, meet us in the battlefield" these men are shouting as they stand in a bomb-blast crater. the rebels are hoping for a no-fly zone, but in the meantime this man and his friends want to knock qaddafi's warplanes out of the sky with surface-to-air missiles. "i trained for a couple of days and it's not hard to use it" he told us. the lightly-trained rebels have run into trouble in the last few days. down the road, government forces have retaken the town. state t.v. showed these pictures and this chilling statement by a qaddafi supporter. >> ( translated ): yesterday we killed you in jawad, today we killed you in ras lanuf, tomorrow we will kill you in everywhere in libya. >> reporter: underlying the message, images of captured rebels face down on the ground. the clearest sign yet that this conflict has reached a dangerous new stage. mandy clark, cbs news, ras lanuf libya. >> couric: the triple in libya has caused the price of gas here to soar. it's now up to an average of $3.52 a gallon. still, that's more than 50 c
he can't predict how long the operation will last, he did say the u.s. could transfer control of it to allied by saturday. house speaker boehner wrote to president obama today to complain that the mission's goals are not clearly defined. more now from mark phillips in tripoli. >> reporter: day five of the bombing campaign over libya and the combined coalition air forces have declared something like victory. >> their air force no longer exists as a fighting force. so the point that we can operate over the air space with impunity. >> reporter: control of the skies has led to near control on the ground, as muammar qaddafi's forces have learned. and as the bombing has continued, the brave face of the regime is showing some worry lines. instead of rambling on for hours as he often does, muammar qaddafi's latest pep rally's speech lasted a brief three minutes. out in public is a risky place for him to be these days. and where the obedient cheering crowds once numbered in tens of thousands, now they are often down to a few hundred, sometimes to mere dozens. even the regime's p. r. ma
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